June 01, 2011

Worship: Methodist

These Houses of Worship were either constructed in the the Township of Lake View (1857-87), the City of Lake View (1887-89), or the District of Lake View (1889-1930)
Broadway United Methodist Church
3338 N Broadway Street
originally called ....
a page from their 1926 directory - image Ebay
Original building 1901-1983
 the building to right of his postcard is the current rectory
On a Monday, July 27, 1891, a committee made up of Charles Busby, Charles Lasher, Reverend Dolliver and A.D. Traveller, selected the church site on the corner of Evanston Avenue (now Broadway) and Buckingham Place. This site was purchased and the church building construction began. 
 
The original church was built of blue bedford stone with a red tile roof. The interior was finished in oak with a large truss ceiling and was completed in 1902. The sanctuary seated 450 congregants.The church staff ministered under the name Evanston Avenue Methodist Episcopal Church until 1914 when the name was changed to Broadway Methodist Episcopal Church in conjunction with the re-naming of several streets in Chicago. 
Serving the needy 1946
The Fire 1983
photo - Lake View Patch 2012
 photo - Lake View Patch 2012
photo - Lake View Patch 2012
photo - Lake View Patch 2012
In 1946 the congregation opened a counseling adviser clinic for members of the community. The clinic dealt with issues such as unemployment, pre-marital & marital issues according to a 1946 Chicago Tribune article. This type of activity in a 'house of worship' was a bit avangard for that time period. In February 1983, a fire gutted the church and most of the beautiful stained-glass windows were lost. By 1969 the denominations of Methodist and Evangelical United Brethren merged into one congregation.
The Original Building was Destroyed 1983
 the newer church
1998 The pastor of this church conducted a same-sex marriage ceremony on church property - a violation of church policy at the time.
Reverend Dell in his church
photo - Chicago Tribune
photo - Michael Greene via Associated Press
Rev. Fred Phelps of the Westboro Baptist Church protests outside the Broadway United Methodist Church Sunday, Nov. 22, 1998 in Chicago. Rev. Phelps and family members came to the church to protest a September marriage between two gay men officiated by Methodist Rev. Gregory Dell. 
In the year 2000 ACLU of Illinois Gay and Lesbian Rights Project's annual John R. Hammell Awards brunch honored Rev. Gregory Dell for performing a same-sex union ceremony. He was suspended from Broadway United Methodist Church for that act but won praise from this gay-friendly neighborhood. Ten years later, Rev. Dell was inducted into Chicago's Gay & Lesbian Hall of Fame Dell's ceremony sparked a change in national church policy
A church with "a wonderful history of being involved in and advocating for social justice movements" is now "ignoring the pain it causes" to a segment of society, he said in 2009.

a congregation with an apparent scene of humor 
 The home of 'gay' friendly homeless youth
also the home of a Catholic based organization
View countless photos of this congregation via Flickr.
And view the post about the community that this 'house of worship' services in my post called Community of Boystown.
Diversey Boulevard Methodist Evangelical
1051 W Diversey Parkway
Township of Lake View
Sheffield Avenue @ George Street - 2nd from bottom
Ravenswood Methodist Evangelical
Township of Lake View
photo - Chuckman Collection
Ravenswood United Methodist Church
Ravenswood-Lake View Community Collection, 
Chicago Public Library via Explore Chicago
 
4 photos - Chicago Sojourn
Ravenswood Methodist Evangelist Church was established in 1872 in Lake View Township and known currently know as the Ravenswood Fellowship.  
Elim Swedish Methodist Episcopal
District of Lake View
photo - Ebay
This church was constructed in 1899 
(click on article to enlarge)
- now condos as of 2008 called The Steeples
Centennial German Methodist Church
and later called...
Lakeside Japanese Christian Church of Chicago
Sheffield and Wellington
image - Chicago: City of Neighborhoods
originally called the Centennial German Methodist Church
1923 Sanborn Fire Map (edited) highlights the 
Chicago & Evanston branch 
of the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul rail tracks
After the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that internment camps were illegal in 1943 Japanese Americans had to settle west of the Mississippi River. Many settled in Chicago due to a residence restriction - must live west of the Mississippi River . This church was one of a few churches for the Japanese community in Lake View. Read more about this congregation's evolution with this link.
Gross Park Methodist Episcopal Church
Sanborn Fire Map location
The church was located a block south of 
Gross Park on Otto Street
 above 1894 
below 1950
the area west of Paulina Street
Otto=Henderson
image - Gross Park on Henderson-Facebook
this Sanborn Fire Map indicated the location of the Northwestern Company railroad station house 
and the Gross Park Hall 
as well as 'Gross Park' on Otto Street


Post Notes:
This post is part of a 6 part series of blog posts about 'Houses of Worship' according to faith. Most Houses of Worship have attached schools on their private property that I may or may not be highlight in any of these posts. These following posts only briefly narrate a particular institution and 'pray' I did not forget one.
The following are a complete list of posts related to 
Houses of Worship:

Read the earliest accounts of the churches of old Lake View 1884 from historian Theodore Andreas that is not covered in this series of post about the 'Houses of Worship' from page 722.
Read the list of all types of churches as of 1905:

Important Note:
These posts are exclusively used for educational purposes. I do not wish to gain monetary profit from this blog nor should anyone else without permission for the original source - thanks!


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